Fact Friday – Snipers

Today I got to shoot a snipers rifle, a freaking 50 calibre sniper rifle, at Lourensford Wine Estate. I didn’t even realize this was something that needed to be on my bucket list but I am so glad it was something I got to do. I wasn’t going to, shoot the big gun that is, as the instructor was more of a “it has a hectic recoil, it’s not really a ladies gun” kinda thing and I told him not to be sexist, also I mean really, don’t show me something awesome and then say I can’t do it cause my brain is a stubborn fool and it will challenge you all the way.

I got to shoot it.

I won’t lie, my shoulder smarts a bit but I wouldn’t take back that experience ever! In fact, I so want to go again! I even got to keep the shell, think I’ll ask my stepdad to drill a hole in it or something so I can do something creative, I don’t know, I’ll still think about it.

I am still not a gun slinging advocate, I won’t go out and buy one or go easy on Fysh with them. I still believe you need to respect them. It’s how I was raised – learn the respect, learn to shoot it properly and realize the damage it can cause so you have even more respect for it. The only reason today is about snipers is because damn they have patience which is seriously something I envy of people. I only had to shoot it once and fok, making that little crosshair go in the right place was frustrating enough just to hit the target once!

 


 

Five Fabulous Interesting Facts

The longest sniper kill distance is 2.47 km, as noted by Deepak Mehta.Computer simulations predict that there would have been a six second gap between the firing of the bullet and collision with the target as the bullet sailed through the air. During that time, the bullet would have dipped 2.8º. IN addition, a small breeze of only 2.7 m/s would have diverted the bullet 9m off course.

Snipers are trained to shoot between heartbeats – The reason for this is that snipers don’t want the blood flow to mess up their fingers when aiming and shooting.

The verb to snipe originated from any hunter adept enough to kill the snipe, a species of bird with a long, slender bill and snipers were originally called “sharpshooters” not because they had to have sharp eyesight, or sharp aim, but because of their use of a Sharps rifle.

Contrary to popular portrayal, snipers often work in pairs, with a spotter holding a short-range weapon to protect the soldier with the long-range weapon. In addition, they often switch to avoid eye fatigue.

Mike Plumb, a SWAT sniper in Columbus, Ohio, once prevented a suicide by shooting a revolver out of the individual’s hand, leaving him unharmed.

 

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